#MeToo Movement takes off

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#MeToo Movement takes off

Tarana Burke is the founder of the Me Too movement. She started the movement in 2006 in hopes of helping women who survived sexual violence.  @strangebirdproductions

Tarana Burke is the founder of the Me Too movement. She started the movement in 2006 in hopes of helping women who survived sexual violence. @strangebirdproductions

The Denver Post

Tarana Burke is the founder of the Me Too movement. She started the movement in 2006 in hopes of helping women who survived sexual violence. @strangebirdproductions

The Denver Post

The Denver Post

Tarana Burke is the founder of the Me Too movement. She started the movement in 2006 in hopes of helping women who survived sexual violence. @strangebirdproductions

Shalene White, Staff Writer

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There has been a barrage of Facebook and Twitter posts with the hashtag “Me Too” circulating around lately. One would think that those mere two words would be insignificant, but that thought is wrong.

This “Me Too” movement could possibly have the biggest meaning to those two ‘trivial’ words.

The Atlantic.com reported that the “Me Too” movement started with Alyssa Milano. “On Sunday afternoon, the actress Alyssa Milano used her Twitter account to encourage women who’d been sexually harassed or assaulted to tweet the words #MeToo.”

The website also reported Milano’s tweet helped fuel the fire for the movement to gain momentum. “In the last 24 hours, a spokesperson from Twitter confirmed, the hashtag had been tweeted nearly half a million times.”

Even though Milano was attributed for starting the wildfire with a tweet, the creator of “Me Too” is Tarana Burke. The Washington Post reported that Burke started the movement. “She founded the “Me Too” movement in 2006 because she, as someone who experienced sexual assault, wanted to do something to help women and girls — particularly women and girls of color — who had also survived sexual violence.”

While posting “Me Too” on social media may help make women feel empowered, it does not reach the root of the issue, the Huffington Post reported. “Guys are rarely told to fix their own predatory behavior. Conversations of sexual harassment and assault are always framed as a “women’s issue.”

The Washington Post also reported “When sexual violence allegations hit the news, men don’t have conversations with one another about how they can help to fix the problem. It’s always women who do the talking among themselves and publicly, starting hashtags (#MyHarveyWeinstein), writing Facebook posts and making lists of countless horror stories in an attempt to shake men into action.”

The entire world could use “Me Too” as a hashtag, but things will not change until the perpetrators face the facts that what they are doing is wrong.