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The Southeastern

Women in office after Hillary’s loss

Jerai Billy, Staff Writer

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In 1894 the first three women legislators elected to the Colorado State of House of Representatives, Ciara Cressingham, Carrie Holly and Frances Klock. There are seventeen women serving as presidents of senate and four women serve as speakers of state reprentatives.

“According to the director of the Women and Politics Institution in Washington D.C., the triumph of an unqualified bigot over the first U.S. female presidential candidate does not spell doom for aspiring female politicians”(vice.com).

There are five reasons why voters say there are less women in office. The first reason being that, men were in office before women and once a person is in office, they have advantages for the reelections and the most winnable seats are already held by a man.

The second reason is that most women wait to run after they have children. The third reason is that redistricting appears to target women, meaning when the lines are redrawn, women often bear the blow. Fourth and fifth reasons are media coverage and the lingering stereotypes, according to us.news.com.

Even though that Hilary lost the election, there were successes for female politicians. Tammy Duckworth won senate seat for democrats in Illinois. Kamala Harris won a senate seat in California and Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto kept the Nevada senate seat.

***Editor’s note: After the Oklahoma election, only 19 seats will be held by women. This represents only 12 percent of elected officials in 2017 according to oklahomawatch.org. This represents a decrease of three seats from last year.

The student news site of Southeastern Oklahoma State University
Women in office after Hillary’s loss